Top 5 World-Wide Domain Seller | Full Review

Whenever you are thinking to start your online business, you need to choose a domain name for your website. But there are a lot of domain name sellers available on the internet. As a beginner, which should you choose to register your domain name?

Don’t worry, in this article, we will review the world’s top 5 domain sellers who are famous for their high-quality services. We will represent the world’s top 5 domain sellers that will be suitable for your online business website. Also, we will review their service, at the end of this article, we will compare each domain name sellers to others.

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1. GoDaddy.Com

Web giant GoDaddy is the world’s biggest domain registrar, currently managing more than 75 million domains for 17 million customers around the globe.

The company is well-known for its low headline prices, and it’s the same story here, for instance,  .mobi domain is available for $7.17 in year one, .uk and .co.uk are $0.99. On the other hand .com and .org are less impressive (though still apparently cheap) starting at $12.17 and $10.17 respectively. Beware, though: these aren’t the bargains they initially seem.

The first catch is that GoDaddy’s starting prices only apply if you pay for two years upfront, and the second year is significantly more expensive (.com rises to $18.17, .uk and .co.uk domains are $12, .co, .org and .mobi are ridiculously high, $34.99 for .co, $21.17 for .org and $32.17 for .mobi. 

Godaddy now offers free basic Whois privacy, a previously optional service. In its simplest form, it redacts your name, address, phone number and email in Godaddy’s WHOIS directory and prevents domain-related spam. 

There’s possibly better value to be had elsewhere, but GoDaddy may still appeal to web beginners looking for a bundled hosting and domain registration deal. The company has an array of products covering every possible requirement, with telephone support if you need it, and buying your domain and hosting from the same provider will make life a little easier.

Just keep in mind that other providers can also combine hosting and domain registration and GoDaddy may not provide the best package for you.

2. Domain.Com

Domain.com was founded in 2000.

The company is owned by Endurance International Group.

The company specializes in domain names, web hosting, VPS hosting, Email, SSL certificates, web design, and online marketing services.

They currently offer WordPress hosting, VPS hosting, and shared hosting plans.

No matter the hosting plan you choose, you’ll receive at least one free domain name along with unlimited disk space, SSL certificate, eCommerce solutions, and marketing tools.

Customer service options include 24/7 phone support as well as a Frequently Asked Questions area.

If you just want to use Domain.com to register a domain, you’ll pay $9.99 every year for a .com and $12.99 for .net website.

3. Hover

Hover is a popular domain name registrar owned by Tucows, which also operates eNom and the domain reselling platform OpenSRS.

Hover’s website is clear and straightforward. A domain pricing page allows for checking registration costs before you start, or you can use the search box to immediately locate your preferred TLD (top-level domain).

By default the results page displays every domain you can register and their prices, giving you a lot to scroll through and read. But a handy sidebar allows filtering domains by categories including Personal, Businesses, Audio and Video, Food and Drink, and more. It’s a neat touch that could help you spot an appealing domain that you otherwise might have missed.

Prices are very reasonable, with .com domains costing $12.99 for year one, .co.uk priced at $10.99, .org costing $13.99 and .mobi reaching $19.99. Shop around and you’ll find slightly lower prices elsewhere, but Hover generally provides good value.

There’s a welcome bonus in Whois Privacy, which comes free for as long as the domain is managed by Hover.

The company keeps upselling to a minimum, even in the final shopping cart stage. You’re simply offered three email-related extras: email forwarding at $5 a year, a 10GB email account for $20, or you can opt for a 1TB inbox, file sharing, a calendar and more, for an annual $29.

If you have any questions, support is available via email and chat, although it’s not 24/7. Working hours are 8 am to 8 pm (Eastern Time) Monday to Friday, and 12 pm to 5 pm at the weekend.

4. NameCheap.Com

Founded in 2000, Namecheap is a popular domain name registrar and web host which now manages more than five million domains.

Namecheap’s excellent website allows searching for individual domains, or in batches of up to 50.

If the domain is taken, you can view the Whois record or offer to buy the domain (via DomainAgents) from the current user.

If the domain is available, results are displayed across four tabs: Popular, New, Discounted, and International. This is a neat approach that makes it easier to browse the list and find what you need.

Prices are generally very good at $7.38 (£5.5) for .com domains – $12.98 on renewal, $6.88(£5.6) for .co.uk – $9.58 on renewal, $8.98 (£6.65) for .org – $14.98 on renewal, and $4.98 (£3.75) for .mobi ($17.98 on renewal). There are some special deals available, and Namecheap has an Agent 88 set of domains which are almost always available at $0.48 (£0.35) for the first year (these usually include the following: .site .website .space .pw .press .host .tech .online and .fun – but there may be others as well).

That would be good value all on its own, but Namecheap doesn’t stop there: you get WhoisGuard domain privacy thrown in for free.

Namecheap’s billing is straightforward and honest, with current and renewal prices clearly described in your Namecheap shopping cart, and Auto-Renew turned off. But if there’s something you don’t understand, helpful FAQ pages and live chat are just a click or two away.

5. Google Domains

Shopping around for a domain registrar can involve a lot of hassle as you research companies you’ve never heard of, try to separate genuine bargains from marketing tricks, and browse the small print looking for hidden catches. With potential savings only amounting to a few pounds or dollars a year, at best, you might prefer to simply sign up with a big-name provider that you know will give you a reasonable service, even if it does cost a fraction more.

Enter Google Domains, Google’s lightweight domain registration arm, a straightforward provider that puts speed and simplicity at the top of its priority list.

Google Domains doesn’t confuse you with endless sales, or ‘special’ deals that turn out to be not so special after all. Upselling is kept to a minimum. Instead, it’s all about making the purchase process as easy as any other online shopping site: search, click, and check out.

The difference is obvious from the moment you reach the site. There are no animated ads at the top of the page, no ‘Sale!’ banners, no low headline prices: just a search box where you enter a single domain.

The results page is equally straightforward, with prices listed for nine common top-level domains, and an All Endings tab listing every option in alphabetical order (domain. academy, domain. bargains, domain. camera).

One potential problem is that Google Domains doesn’t support all the domain extensions you’ll get elsewhere, and this includes some quite common examples (.mobi, .tv). If you think you might ever want to buy something beyond the most popular extensions, it’s a good idea to check that your likely choices are available before you buy.

Prices are standardized to whole numbers, so for example .com, .co.uk and .org domains are all priced at $12. That’s a little above average overall, but better than some, especially as Google Domains throws in free Whois privacy for as long as you’re registered. That’s a valuable extra which could cost $2.80 to $11.20 a year elsewhere.

If you do have any questions, a Help link displays articles on common problems. If that’s not enough, the Contact Us page enables talking to a support agent by email, live chat, or telephone (Google calls you), the highest level of domain registrar support we’ve seen anywhere.

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